California State University, Fullerton


IC Scholars Advisor: Valerie O’Regan, Ph.D.

California State University, Fullerton
Political, Administration & Justice
Fullerton, CA 92834-6848
(714) 278-3468
voregan@fullerton.edu

Deadline to submit application to program: April 18

Minimum GPA: 3.2
Two of the Following Core Courses:

PHIL 105: Critical Thinking
HCOM 102: Public Speaking
ENG 301: Advanced College Writing
Four of the Following Elective Courses:

GEOG 340: Asia
GEOG 344: Africa
GEOG 346: The Middle East
GEOG 360: Geography of the World’s Economies
GEOG 481: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
POSC 352: American Foreign Policy
POSC 434: Asia-Pacific in World Affairs
POSC 437: Latin American Politics
POSC 438: Western European Democracies
POSC 456: The National Security Establishment

Course Descriptions:

PHIL 105: Critical Thinking – Development of non-mathematical critical reasoning skills, including recognition of arguments, argument evaluation and construction of arguments.
HCOM 102: Public Speaking – Theory and presentation of public speeches, including an analysis of determinants of comprehension and attitude formation; selection and organization of speech materials, development of delivery skills and evaluation of message effectiveness.
ENG 301: Advanced College Writing – Prerequisite: ENG 101. An advanced course in writing expository prose. Emphasizes precision in rhetoric and development of individual style by concentration on matters of diction, audience, emphasis and persuasion.
GEOG 340: Asia – The physical, human and regional geography of Asia from Pakistan and India through Southeast Asia and the Malay Archipelago to China, Japan and Korea.
GEOG 344: Africa – The physical, human and regional geography of Africa, Saharan borderlands, East Africa and Southern Africa.
GEOG 346: The Middle East – Explores the geography of the Middle East from North Africa to Central Asia, with emphasis on the region’s physical, cultural, historical, economic, and political geography and contemporary issues facing the region.
GEOG 360: Geography of the World’s Economies – Geographic perspectives on the global production of goods and services and the distribution to consumers. An exploration of key geographic issues in uneven development, international trade, investment patterns, and the spatial integration of local and regional economies.
GEOG 481: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems – Methods and applications of computer-assisted mapping and geographic information systems.
POSC 352: American Foreign Policy – United States foreign policy since World War II. Institutions and bureaucracies of foreign policy decision-making, military and national security policy, and domestic sources of foreign policy.
POSC 434: China and Friends: Friends or Foes? A comparison of the politics of Japan and China illuminates both similarities and differences in the premises, processes and policies of these two Asian giants.
POSC 437: Latin American Politics – Systematic analysis of government and politics in selected Latin American states. Considers democratization, state structures, relation of politics to economics and alternative theories and approaches to comparative political analysis as applied to a region marked by ethnic and racial diversity
POSC 438: Western European Democracies – A comparative study of the government and politics of Western European democracies, including their cooperation within the European Union. Domestic as well as foreign policies will be analyzed.
POSC 456: The National Security Establishment – Conflicting theories of national security; the functions of defense and intelligence bureaucracies in foreign and domestic policy making, problems of arms control and the dangers to democratic values and institutions posed by the technology of national security.
POSC 451T: Problems in International Politics – Selected problems in contemporary world politics. Topics include international responses to terrorism, China in international affairs, U.S. grand strategy after the Cold War, and 9/11.
POSC 456: National Security Establishment – Conflicting theories of national security, the functions of defense and intelligence bureaucracies in foreign and domestic policy making, problems of arms control and the dangers to democratic values and institutions posed by the technology of national security.